DOE attempts giving all students some leniency on FSA testing

Lili Wortmann ‘21

STAFF WRITER


As the 2021 school year ends the questions of state testing and what it means for the sophomores and students at Riverview High school has been frequently asked. Earlier this month, the Florida Department of Education (DOE) was already thinking about how to handle FSA testing and the requirements for moving up to the next grade level and what it means for current graduating students.

Commissioner of Education Richard Corcoran passed an emergency order in early April that would have a large effect on the current School year--like how much students’ EOCs would be able to affect them. The order has many other plans, like reopening schools in the 2022-23 school year and how that would affect the brick-and-mortar students.

According to the emergency order that was released earlier this month, it says that it “is now more critical than ever so that educators and parents can measure progress and determine what additional services and supports are needed to ensure that each student is given the services and supports they need to succeed in life.” The order explained that with this year's disruptions they wanted what was best for the students and to create any opportunity they could to help students pass and move forward in school.

The order also included many other decisions for the next school year, like online students and whether they would continue by saying they wanted to provide, “funding stability for school districts and educational options for parents during the pandemic, including in-person, innovative and virtual instruction." The order is giving full responsibility to the districts to decide whether they would continue with online options.

Arin Glucker ‘23 said he was not concerned.

“I wasn’t particularly worried about the writing FSA, due to the work we do in class as well as the rubric being loose,” after being asked if he felt well prepared for the FSA Writing test a few weeks ago.

Sophomore Ben Morris agreed.

“It was easy not gonna lie, I’m kinda just worried because it's my worst subject,” he said after being asked the same question.”

While some students felt completely the opposite, Taylor Lockner ‘23 was asked about how she felt about the FSA reading, and her response was, “I honestly feel the most underprepared I have ever felt. I am nervous, and I am not prepared to take this test.”

Many students are mixed about the state tests and happy that Florida’ DOE is allowing the schools so much leniency and trying to give students as many opportunities as they can.